Promises are Meant to be Kept – And Here is how Businesses can Do It!

Singtel_new_logo

Source: Mothership.sg

This week Singapore Telco Singtel announces the launch of a new logo. The new logo is part of a re-branding exercise, which includes a new Brand Promise:

Let’s make everyday better

According to their CEO, the re-branding exercise was launched to counter unhappy customers, with some even calling the telco ‘Stinktel’ to highlight their unhappiness over poor customer service. The new Brand Promise promises better service and more caring attention to the little things that conveys to the customer that Singtel cares.

Readers can read the details of the change in this article: https://sg.news.yahoo.com/singtel-just-unveiled-logo-looks-023544688.html

What however intrigues me is the use of the term ‘Brand Promise’ instead of ‘Branding’. And if Singtel is truly intent on fulfilling a Brand Promise rather than just build brand equity or create brand awareness, I applaud them. From the view of a business coach, Brand Promises are one of the most important ways to build raving fans and loyal customers. It is one of the first few things I help my clients build to gain a strategic advantage over their competitors.

So What is a Brand Promise?

It is a promise – A promise meant to be kept. Every time a transaction takes place, it is an exchange of money for the promise of something. That ‘something’ is expected. In today’s world. where transactions go beyond the simple barter trade, what we implicitly promise in the transaction involves the tangible product you sell, and the experience that comes from dealing with you, as well as the experience of using your product after the transaction. It does not end when the service concludes or when the product is consumed. People blog and write about their experience long after they finish their deal with you.

While Branding gives association and awareness, a Brand Promise is a bond that is established firmly between you and the customer. It is a bond that you must honor. It is a commitment that your brand, representing your company and all who are associated with it, will deliver what was paid for in both tangible and intangible ways.

For example, one of the premier airlines I take for business trips and the rare holiday messed up its luggage loading badly during a family vacation. More than fifty people did not get their luggage. While the flight was great e.g. flying comfort, food, cabin crew service, the way they handled the troubled customers was horrendous! They simply did not care. Emails took as long as a month to get a reply. Compensation was paltry for the inconvenience caused. And the worst experience I had was to deal with the automated, templated email replies to queries. By the end of the experience, I could memorize their standard reply word for word. It was as though this award winning airline is run by robots!

They wanted very much to tell me they DID NOT CARE! Remember, a contract with the customer is no longer restricted to the moment the product is consumed or the service is used. The whole experience, including post-service, is equally important!

While this airline has great branding involving winning several awards and international rankings, it broke its Brand Promise. Period.  I’m not impressed with its ranking when I’ve discovered they don’t care at all when they made a mistake that affected me. I’m not expecting perfect service; things happen especially when transporting a few hundred people. But a broken promise, even if its an intangible one, is something never forgotten. In fact, it is the intangible promises that are more critical than the tangible ones.  A Brand Promise, whether official or not, is equally real to the customer. And it left a sour taste in me for a long time as a customer.

Every Company Needs to Formulate and Track its Brand Promise

Your Brand Promise, whether you have strategically worked out one or not, is taken seriously by your customers. Even if you do not have one, your customers expects it. If you don’t have one, they will create one for you. When you have a Brand Promise that works, it will give you tremendous advantage because it essentially becomes an emotional bond tying your customer to you every time the Brand Promise is kept. And when you have one, you can strategically manage it and use it to your advantage.

Creating a Brand Promise

From the customer’s perspective, they demand it whether you have it or not. A Brand Promise can therefore be a strategic, calculated move to win you loyal customers.

How do we create a Brand Promise? Firstly, do you know your WHO? You need to define your Core Customer, and the clearer you can articulate your Core Customer, the better.

Who is your Core Customer? Is your business, and your Brand Promise targeting a want, a need or a fear? What is your customer really buying from you? For the case of Singtel’s customers, are they buying a phone and a line or are they buying convenience, lifestyle, status and connection with friends and family?

Next will be to break down the Brand Promise into supporting metrics and KPIs. This step is extremely important, because it tells you whether your company is delivering on its Brand Promise or not. In developing metrics, keep it to a few critical ones. As a rule of thumb, your metrics for Brand Promises should focus on a few areas ONLY:

Productivity, frequency and customer satisfaction are common ways to set the Brand Promise KPIs on.

Too many and you lose track of what is important. In my course of work, I notice some companies love to have complex metrics – too complicated to tell them what is really happening!

When setting Brand Promise KPIs – KISS (Keep it short and sweet)

And the presence of KPIs and measurables will differentiate your Brand Promise from a slogan. Slogans are meaningless, but Brand Promises are powerful. They are powerful because they are promises, and a promise kept is a bond made between the buyer and the seller. You want to establish more of such bonds and strengthen them, because it is always easier to sell to your fan than to a stranger.

I am excited to see businesses move from using Branding to win customers to using a Brand Promise. As a customer, I am most definitely thrilled when a promise is fulfilled.

I applaud Singtel in their move from branding towards Brand Promises. I look forward to the day when more companies build great brand promises.

And if you want to know how to build a great Brand Promise to take your business further, help is just an email away!

Differentiate Your Business by Saying a BIG Thank You!

This is one youtube video that blew my mind! The sheer audacity of this bank’s move is sure to make them a business to remember forever.

TD Bank in Canada launched a campaign to thank its customers by giving them money, (yes, in the form of $20 handouts), favourite t-shirts, air tickets and even a college fund!

Watch the video here: 

WHY???

Are they crazy? Are they too rich?

I don’t think so. In business terms, it is a differentiating move. In Gazelles International coaching terms, it is a Winning Move. What are Winning Moves?

They are things that your competitor would never do, but your customer will love you to death for it. It is also something that deals with what your customer hates, turning it into something they did not expect but totally love. Beneath the gimicky moves of handing out money and gifts, what really happened is a bank that says, “Hey, you are not a digit for me to squeeze money from. You are more important than me and I recognize that. Your needs are important to me, and I stand with you.” i love the part where the lady gets to go see her daughter (spoiler alert).

It connects on a very human level of wanting to be appreciated and treated like a…human being. Everyone who has been to a bank, and who has been following the news over the last 6-7 years knows how banks really view their customers – like cows to be milked.

So gimicky or not, marketing ploy or not, what matters is it connects. It differentiates TD bank from its competitors by doing something their competitors hate to do. Banks take money; they don’t give money.

A nice winning move – heartwarming too. And millions of views as the video went viral.

Good strategy differentiates businesses. Do you have a Winning Move up your sleeve? Remember, it must be something your customer really wants but your competitor hates to do. Winning Moves are dangerous, but they will make your business GREAT.